Embroidered patch, reminiscent of 1940s warship art

LS Nicholas Dipersio (centre) presents the unit’s new morale patch that he designed to LCdr Tyson Bergmann, Patrol Craft Training Unit (PCTU) Commanding Officer, and CPO2 Eric Pohoney, PCTU Coxswain.

LS Nicholas Dipersio (centre) presents the unit’s new morale patch that he designed to LCdr Tyson Bergmann, Patrol Craft Training Unit (PCTU) Commanding Officer, and CPO2 Eric Pohoney, PCTU Coxswain.

Peter Mallett, Staff Writer ~

The sailor who created the Patrol Craft Training Unit’s (PCTU) first morale patch admits the words colourful or cartoonish often come to mind when people first see his design.

Leading Seaman Nicholas Dipersio purposely choose a cartoon-style portrayal of an Orca whale at the helm of a PCTU vessel as a nod to bygone days of naval art.

“The whole intent was to be cartoonish and represent the old school ways that morale patches used to look,” said LS Dipersio. “The idea to make the patch less rigid and more light-hearted in nature came from naval tradition and some of the older design ideas that were painted on the side of Canadian warships during the Second World War.”

He was presented the first patch by Lieutenant-Commander Tyson Bergmann, PCTU’s Commanding Officer, and Chief Petty Officer Second Class Eric Pohoney, PCTU Coxswain, on Aug. 10. The embroidered patches will be worn on the naval combat jackets of the 70 men and women who work aboard the unit’s eight Orca-class Patrol Vessels, which are used to train personnel from Naval Fleet School Pacific and the Naval Officer Training Centre.

Historically, patches boost morale and build unit pride. PCTU’s patch also has two red maple leafs bordering an inscription that trumpets the unit’s motto: Training Leaders Building Confidence.

LS Dipersio, 35, has served eight years in the Royal Canadian Navy, and studied graphic design. The concept behind the logo was developed in early June with his co-worker LS James Hopper. He then put pencil to paper and came up with the design. After getting approval he made a digital rendering, so the image could be embroidered onto a cloth patch.

CPO2 Pohoney says the design has achieved its goal and gives sailors in his unit a sense of pride.

“The intention is to boost morale, create uniqueness, and give our personnel a sense of belonging. It’s not meant to be aggressive, serious or overpowering, but rather colourful and inviting, so people in our unit and those onboard our vessels have a safe and enjoyable experience.”

Filed Under: Top Stories

About the Author: The Lookout Newspaper can trace its history back to April 1943 when CFB Esquimalt’s first newspaper was published. Since then, Lookout has grown into the award winning source for Pacific Navy News. Leading the way towards interactive social media reach, we are a community resource newspaper growing a world wide audience.

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  1. Heather Parker says:

    Love the new design. Nicely done.

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