Pacific Fleet

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Patrol Frigates

Halifax-class patrol frigates were built under the Canadian Patrol Frigate Program. One of the most advanced warships in the world, they were designed primarily as a general-purpose frigate, carrying extensive anti-submarine, anti-surface and anti-air defence systems. Continue Reading…


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Submarines

The Victoria-Class diesel-electric submarines are 70.26 metres in length, displace 2,455 tons (dived), can reach submerged speed of 20 knots, and carry a crew of 48 personnel. Continue Reading…


 Fleet Maintenance Facility Cape Breton Apprenticeship Program


Sea Kings

Canadian naval vessels can embark twin-engine CH 124 Sea King gas turbine medium range helicopters HMCS Regina (334) was built by MIL/Davie Ltd. Continue Reading…


CAF Recruiting


Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels (MCDVs)

Kingston-class Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels (MCDVs) provide the Royal Canadian Navy with the capability to perform its maritime coastal surveillance missions with specific packages for route survey, ocean bottom inspection, containerized dive system and law enforcement. Continue Reading…


Lookout sales department


Patrol Craft Training

The Orca-class vessels’ primary mission is to support navigation and seamanship training and fulfill the training requirements of Venture, the Naval Officer Training Centre, Canadian Forces Fleet School Esquimalt, Naval Reserve Divisions from across Canada and Pacific Region Cadets. Continue Reading…


Lookout sales department


Sail Training Ketch

HMCS Oriole is the oldest and longest serving commissioned ship in the Royal Canadian Navy. Launched in1921 and commissioned into the RCN in 1952. Continue Reading…


Patrol Frigates

Halifax-class patrol frigates were built under the Canadian Patrol Frigate Program. One of the most advanced warships in the world, they were designed primarily as a general-purpose frigate, carrying extensive anti-submarine, anti-surface and anti-air defence systems. In peacetime, the ships are capable of employing state-of-the-art technology to carry out a variety of important missions, assigned according to its state of readiness, high or normal, by Commander Canadian Fleet Pacific. Such missions may include lengthy deployments, Task Group Exercises, Search and Rescue, or Fisheries and Sovereignty patrols. Canadian Patrol Frigates (CPFs) are capable of cruising speeds greater than 28 knots and have a displacement of some 5,000 tonnes. They also carry torpedoes, missiles, a 57mm gun forward and assorted close-in weapons systems.

HMCS Vancouver (331) was the first of the Halifax-class frigates to arrive on the West Coast. On Aug. 23, 1993, she was commissioned as Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Vancouver alongside Canada Place in Vancouver, British Columbia.
Ship’s Motto: “Ever on guard”
HMCS Regina (334) was built by MIL/Davie Ltd. of Lauzon, Quebec. Lauzon is the same shipyard that built the first HMCS Regina, K-234, in 1942. The current HMCS Regina was commissioned on Dec. 29, 1993.
Ship’s Motto: “Let Regina flourish”
HMCS Calgary (335) is the third Canadian Patrol Frigate built at Marine Industries Limited, Lauzon P.Q., and the second Canadian warship named after the City of Calgary. Calgary was commissioned in Esquimalt on May 12, 1995.
Ship’s Motto: “Onward”
HMCS Winnipeg (338) is the second warship to carry the name Winnipeg. The ship’s keel was laid March 20, 1993, in New Brunswick. Winnipeg was christened in a traditional ceremony in Saint John June 25, 1994, and commissioned into Her Majesty’s service on June 23, 1995, in Esquimalt.
Ship’s Motto: “One with the strength of many”
HMCS Ottawa (341) is the fourth ship in the Canadian Navy to carry this proud name. Commissioned in Cornwall, Ontario, Sept. 28, 1996, Ottawa is the fifth and last Halifax Class frigate to join Canada’s Pacific Fleet.
Ship’s Motto: “Eager beaver”

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Submarines

The Victoria-Class diesel-electric submarines are 70.26 metres in length, displace 2,455 tons (dived), can reach submerged speed of 20 knots, and carry a crew of 48 personnel. They have an operational range of 8,000 miles, are capable of diving to 200 metres, and can operate submerged for 90 hours.

HMCS Victoria (876) was commissioned on Dec. 2, 2000. Victoria was the first of the Victoria-class submarines to be accepted into the Royal Canadian Navy. Victoria was transferred to Canadian Fleet Pacific at CFB Esquimalt in August 2003.
HMCS Victoria’s Motto: “Expect no warning”
HMCS Chicoutimi (879) was named on Oct. 2, 2004, at Faslane, Scotland, and will be commissioned in Victoria, B.C. following completion of an Extended Docking Refit Period and Sea Trials. Chicoutimi transferred to Canadian Fleet Pacific at CFB Esquimalt in April 2009.
HMCS Chicoutimi’s Motto: “Maître du domaine”

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Sea Kings

Canadian naval vessels can embark twin-engine CH 124 Sea King gas turbine medium range helicopters. Introduced in 1963, these aircraft have been extensively modified throughout their service and continue to operate as an organic asset of the ship. The Sea King’s primary role has remained anti-submarine warfare, with a diverse list of secondary roles including maritime situational awareness, search and rescue, passenger transport, and maritime interdiction operations.

The Sea King helicopter’s crew consists of two pilots, an Air Combat Systems Officer (ACSO) and an Airborne Electronic Systems Operator (AESOP). The CH 124A Sea King is equipped with variable depth sonar, radar for surface search, is instrumented for all weather missions and can carry two MK 46 anti-submarine torpedoes. The CH 124B variant has the sonar removed and is now primarily used for utility and passenger missions and maritime interdiction operations. Both aircraft are capable of carrying a door mounted general purpose machine gun.

Air operations in rough seas are possible with the aid of the Canadian designed “Beartrap” or Helicopter Hauldown Rapid Securing Device which allows operations of up to 25 degrees of ship roll.

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Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels (MCDVs)

Kingston-class Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels (MCDVs) provide the Royal Canadian Navy with the capability to perform its maritime coastal surveillance missions with specific packages for route survey, ocean bottom inspection, containerized dive system and law enforcement. The ships displace 980 tonnes and with twin diesel-electric propulsion are capable of cruising at 15 knots. With a core crew of 31, the Kingston Class are manned by a blend of Naval Reserve and Regular Force personnel.

HMCS Nanaimo (702) commissioned in Nanaimo in May 1997.
Ship’s Motto: “Faith and labour”
HMCS Edmonton (703) commissioned in Esquimalt June 1997.
Ship’s Motto: “Industry enriches”
HMCS Whitehorse (705) commissioned in Esquimalt in April 1998.
Ship’s Motto: “Fortune favours the daring”
HMCS Yellowknife (706)
Ship’s Motto: “I endeavour in difficulties”
HMCS Sakatoon (709)
Ship’s Motto: “Brave as a faithful lion”
HMCS Brandon (710)
Ship’s Motto: “She acquires strength through progress”

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Patrol Craft Training

The Orca-class vessels’ primary mission is to support navigation and seamanship training and fulfill the training requirements of Venture, the Naval Officer Training Centre, Canadian Forces Fleet School Esquimalt, Naval Reserve Divisions from across Canada and Pacific Region Cadets. The eight Orcas are:

  • Orca (PCT 55)
  • Raven (PCT 56)
  • Caribou (PCT 57)
  • Renard (PCT 58)
  • Wolf (PCT 59)
  • Grizzley (PCT 60)
  • Cougar (PCT 61)
  • Moose (PCT 62)

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Sail Training Ketch

HMCS Oriole is the oldest and longest serving commissioned ship in the Royal Canadian Navy. Launched in1921 and commissioned into the RCN in 1952, Oriole remains true to her original design as an ocean racing yacht. Oriole excels in her mission providing leadership training for junior officers/sailors and visiting ports of call as a goodwill ambassador for the Royal Canadian Navy. HMCS Oriole’s home port is with the rest of the Pacific Fleet in Esquimalt, British Columbia. The ship sails the waters of the Pacific Northwest training junior officers and sailors while participating in races, festivals, charity events and goodwill visits.

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