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  • Chaplain David Thomas — “You could take a long walk along the water and be inspired by the beauty of watching the sun go down to tend your physical and spiritual health.” As we roll into May, we are well into springtime. Over the last several weeks, I have noticed many people out in their yards tending and tidying up. Tidying up in general often seems to go hand-in-hand with spring. Sometimes the changes in seasons can be a marker for the seasons of our own lives. So, as we’re gearing up for summer, maybe we need to do some personal tidying in our lives. In her book Are you really OK?, author and licensed professional counsellor Debra Fileta gives a framework for human wholeness that I find very helpful. She highlights four aspects of human health that need individual attention but also how together they form part of our wholistic being. They are our emotional, spiritual, mental and physical health. She also highlights how health in each of these areas can impact the various aspects of our relational health – another key component to health as a human being. In the exercise world, there is a concept intended to help busy people ‘find the time’ for improvement. It’s called the ‘minimum effective dose’ and it asks the question, “What is the least amount of work that needs to be done to see improvement?” Here, the goal is to implement small changes that can have a positive cumulative effect. So, maybe it’s time to work on improving your mental health and well-being. You could read a new book, take in a comedy show with friends, or invest in relationships. You could take a long walk along the water and be inspired by the beauty of watching the sun go down and focus on your spiritual health. All these are small changes that can have a cumulative effect. Now, some of you might be thinking, “I’m good, Padre”. Unfortunately, we as humans have a tendency to see ourselves as doing better than we are. Social scientists call this the better-than-average-effect. When asked about anything from driving skills to mental health, the majority of people will rate themselves as doing better than average. Mathematically speaking, this can’t be reality, as half of all people would be below the median. So, with this very human bias, we often think we’re doing okay when, in fact, we might not be doing as well as we report. Maybe this is cause to pause for a moment…to contemplate…to do an honest self-evaluation. In the areas of emotional, mental, spiritual, physical, and relational health, is there one thing that we could improve? What is the least we can do to improve our wholeness?

    Chaplain’s Corner: The least we can do

    Chaplain David Thomas — “You could take a long walk along the water and be inspired by the beauty of watching the sun go down to tend your physical and spiritual health.” As we roll into May, we are well into springtime. Over the last several weeks, I have noticed many people out in their yards tending and tidying up. Tidying up […[

  • Chaplain David Thomas — “You could take a long walk along the water and be inspired by the beauty of watching the sun go down to tend your physical and spiritual health.” As we roll into May, we are well into springtime. Over the last several weeks, I have noticed many people out in their yards tending and tidying up. Tidying up in general often seems to go hand-in-hand with spring. Sometimes the changes in seasons can be a marker for the seasons of our own lives. So, as we’re gearing up for summer, maybe we need to do some personal tidying in our lives. In her book Are you really OK?, author and licensed professional counsellor Debra Fileta gives a framework for human wholeness that I find very helpful. She highlights four aspects of human health that need individual attention but also how together they form part of our wholistic being. They are our emotional, spiritual, mental and physical health. She also highlights how health in each of these areas can impact the various aspects of our relational health – another key component to health as a human being. In the exercise world, there is a concept intended to help busy people ‘find the time’ for improvement. It’s called the ‘minimum effective dose’ and it asks the question, “What is the least amount of work that needs to be done to see improvement?” Here, the goal is to implement small changes that can have a positive cumulative effect. So, maybe it’s time to work on improving your mental health and well-being. You could read a new book, take in a comedy show with friends, or invest in relationships. You could take a long walk along the water and be inspired by the beauty of watching the sun go down and focus on your spiritual health. All these are small changes that can have a cumulative effect. Now, some of you might be thinking, “I’m good, Padre”. Unfortunately, we as humans have a tendency to see ourselves as doing better than we are. Social scientists call this the better-than-average-effect. When asked about anything from driving skills to mental health, the majority of people will rate themselves as doing better than average. Mathematically speaking, this can’t be reality, as half of all people would be below the median. So, with this very human bias, we often think we’re doing okay when, in fact, we might not be doing as well as we report. Maybe this is cause to pause for a moment…to contemplate…to do an honest self-evaluation. In the areas of emotional, mental, spiritual, physical, and relational health, is there one thing that we could improve? What is the least we can do to improve our wholeness?

    Le coin de l’aumônier : le moins que nous puissions faire

    Aumônier David Thomas —  “Vous pouvez faire une longue promenade le long de l’eau et vous laisser inspirer par la beauté du coucher de soleil pour soigner votre santé physique et spirituelle”. Alors que nous entrons dans le mois de mai, le printemps pointe le bout de son nez. Au cours des dernières semaines, j’ai remarqué […]

  • Crew members of the Motor Vessel (MV) Asterix perform a Replenishment-At-Sea (RAS) Layout, during TGEX 2024, April 22. Photo: Master Corporal Nathan Spence, Maritime Forces Pacific Imaging Services, Esquimalt, BC.

    Task Group Exercise 2024 concludes

    Captain Pedram Mohyeddin, MARPAC PAO — Task Group Exercise 2024 (TGEX 24-01), which saw units practicing and enhancing capabilities, recently concluded off the coast of Vancouver Island. The TGEX, which ran from April 22 to May 3 focused on interoperability between joint elements, and featured the inclusion of the United States Navy. Led by HMCS Vancouver, several units […]

  • Crew members of the Motor Vessel (MV) Asterix perform a Replenishment-At-Sea (RAS) Layout, during TGEX 2024, April 22. Photo: Master Corporal Nathan Spence, Maritime Forces Pacific Imaging Services, Esquimalt, BC.

    Conclusion de l’exercice du groupe de travail 2024

    Capitaine Pedram Mohyeddin, OAP MARPAC — L’exercice du groupe opérationnel 2024 (TGEX 24-01), au cours duquel les unités se sont entraînées et ont renforcé leurs capacités, s’est récemment achevé au large de l’île de Vancouver.  Le TGEX, qui s’est déroulé du 22 avril au 3 mai, s’est concentré sur l’interopérabilité entre les éléments interarmées, avec la participation de la marine […]

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